Tagged: Weather Forecasting

Barry Myers, CEO of AccuWeather, has been nominated to lead the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. (Credit: Diane Bondareff/ AP Images)

Trump Administration Science Leadership Roles Move Forward

On Wednesday, President Trump announced his intent to nominate Mr. Barry Myers (CEO, AccuWeather) to lead the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Several other science and technology nominations and confirmations of interest to the ocean science community also occurred. Why It Matters- As our nation recovers from extreme weather events from coast to coast, the importance of NOAA to public safety cannot be understated.

(Credit: Kevin J. Neff/U.S. Coast Guard )

On Thin Ice

What It Was The Senate Arctic Caucus, Senate Oceans Caucus, and Congressional Arctic Working Group, in conjunction with the Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe (U.S. Helsinki Commission), hosted a briefing, “A New...

(Credit: NOAA)

Science: Predicting The Future, Saving Lives

The United States Geological Survey (USGS), the National​ ​Oceanic​ ​and​ ​Atmospheric​ ​Administration (NOAA) and partners, in conjunction with Senators Shelley Moore Capito (WV) and Bill Nelson (FL) hosted a briefing, “How Science Supports Flood Forecasting and Public Safety.”

Making science-based decisions requires data and information.

Trio Of Ocean And Great Lakes Bills Passes Senate Committee

Making science-based decisions requires data and information. Ocean and coastal policies and management decisions also require current and robust observations and monitoring. All three bipartisan bills will advance monitoring and research of the ocean, Great Lakes, and fisheries through grants, linking programs (ICOOS and FOARAM) and topics (ocean observations with sound and with economy), and by updating important indices.

The National Weather Service provides key research and technology for storm, atmosphere, and climate modeling.

At Drought Hearing, Senators Worry National Weather Service Funding Will Dry Up

Dry weather continues to be problematic for Western states, and climate change predictions indicate droughts will only worsen. The president’s budget request for Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 proposes funding cuts to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) by 16 percent – and the proposed four percent decrease to the agency’s National Weather Service would challenge the program. The National Weather Service plays a crucial role in understanding drought patterns, preparing communities for limited water availability, and helping scientists understand the changing climate. Stakeholders say forecasting research and technology innovations are key to future preparedness.

A Saildrone Unmanned Surface Vehicle. (Credit: Saildrone)

Vessels Without People And A Panel Without NOAA

Hurricanes this century have cost thousands of Americans their lives and billions of dollars in damage; Hurricane Katrina alone killed 1,833 people and cost the government $108 billion. Weather forecasting is of utmost importance to save lives, property, and money, especially in light of the changing climate. In a hearing held by the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, Subcommittee on Environment, scientists and professionals in the environmental technology industry discussed the potential for public-private partnerships to strengthen weather forecasting and to improve oceanic data collection.

Red snapper (credit: Wikipedia commons)

Red Snapper And Proposed Budget Cuts Snap Attention Of Senators During Appropriations Committee Hearing

The Department of Commerce (DOC) touches your life in more ways than you’d imagine, impacting areas from trade to economic development to weather forecasting. On Thursday, the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, and Science held a hearing to discuss the president’s budget recommendations for the DOC for Fiscal Year (FY) 2018. Senators from both sides of the aisle were concerned with the proposed steep cuts, which represent a 15.8 percent decrease from FY 2017 enacted levels and highlighted programs, including Sea Grant, that have tremendous returns on investment for their states.

Mr. Ross highlighted the role of fisheries in the trade deficit. (Credit: PROVirginia Sea Grant/ Flickr)

“Difficult Decisions Needed To Be Made”

Those watching Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross testify before the House Appropriations Committee, Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies on the president’s budget request for Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 may at times have been able to anticipate his answers. As the secretary fielded questions from worried Democrats regarding agencies and programs the White House proposed to eliminate or to drastically cut, his responses remained consistent. Whether answering queries about the elimination of the Sea Grant Program, the Minority Business Development Agency, or the Manufacturing Extension Partnership Program, Secretary Ross was unwavering in his answer that tradeoffs had to be made to fund the administration’s priorities, “and with the big increases in defense and military and national security, cuts have to be made somewhere.”