Tagged: STEM Education

The House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology held a hearing to examine this overhead cost of federally-funded science research at universities (Credit: Getty Images)

The Indirect Costs Of Research

Science is hard enough, now imagine pipetting in the dark or using a microscope for advanced research that’s better suited for a fourth-grade class. To cover the “indirect” costs of doing federally-funded research, such as paying for laboratory bills, disposing of hazardous waste, and complying with federal regulations, each university and the government determine an overhead rate for research projects. Last week, the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology held a hearing to examine this overhead cost of federally-funded science research at universities.

The House Education And Workforce Committee met to discuss upgrades to a decade-old education law. (Credit: Mithril Cloud/ Wikimedia Commons)

Getting Technical With Education Law

With technological advancement occurring at ever-increasing speed, it seems surprising that a law meant to better align career and technical education (CTE) programs with students in need of new skills and employers in need of qualified workers hasn’t been updated in more than a decade. The House Committee on Education and the Workforce approved by voice vote a bipartisan update to this law, the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act (H.R.2353). Discussion around the bill echoed that of the recent National Science Board quarterly meeting, which highlighted the shifting demographics of the STEM workforce, which includes ocean engineers and marine scientists.

More and more college graduates spend time earning their degree through a community college or technical institution. (Credit: Pixabay)

Building A New STEM Workforce

Nearly half of U.S. college graduates spent time on community and technical college campuses. The skilled technical workforce – those outside four-year institutions who use science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) in their jobs – consists of approximately 16 million individuals, and it is estimated by next year, 35 percent of the STEM workforce will have sub-baccalaureate degrees. During the quarterly meeting of the 24-member National Science Board (NSB), which establishes overall priorities for the National Science Foundation (NSF), one topic of discussion centered around a draft work plan on how the agency can reach students outside the traditional four-year college institutions to develop the shifting STEM workforce.

The STEM Education Coalition discussed the current climate of STEM education for K-12 students. (Credit: opensource.com/Flickr)

STEM Education 101

As science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) are a part of everything we do, making a STEM-literate society critically important. Last week, the STEM Education Coalition, in conjunction with nearly a dozen other organizations and associations, held a briefing, “STEM 101: Major Policy Issues for the 115th Congress.” Chairman Lamar Smith (TX-21) and Ranking Member Eddie Bernice Johnson (TX-30) of the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology were the congressional hosts.

The NSB launched “a new tool for policymakers, educators, business leaders, students and others to assess the career opportunities for those with doctoral degrees in SEH fields.” (Credit: National Science Board)

Science, Engineering, Health Doctorates Find Career Success

The National Science Board, the National Science Foundation’s policy arm, has released an interactive infographic that explores 25 years of science, engineering and health (SEH) doctoral pathways. The NSB launched “a new tool for policymakers, educators, business leaders, students and others to assess the career opportunities for those with doctoral degrees in SEH fields.”

Researchers in Rhode Island and Nebraska will focus on the development of new kinds of solar cells containing crystalline perovskites grown from solutions, such as the one pictured here. Brown University is the lead institution for this project. (Credit: Amy Simmons/Padture Lab, Brown University)

Future STEMs From Education

Twenty percent of all jobs in the U.S. required a high level of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) in 2011, a number projected to only increase in the coming decades. Statistics like the one above highlight the importance of last week’s hearing of the Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Subcommittee of the Senate Appropriations Committee, which focused on the future of STEM education.

A number of new bills introduced in this Congress were of relevance to the ocean science community. One relates to ocean acification research.(Credit: NOAA)

New Congress Means New Legislation

In a scene more appropriate for a college laboratory than the Capitol building (lab safety protocols aside), Senator Sheldon Whitehouse (RI) measured pH on the Senate floor during an ocean acidification demonstration. The act...