Tagged: Seafood

A sustainable fishery is one that is harvested at a sustainable rate, where the fish population does not decline over time due to fishing practices. (Credit: NOAA)

A Blue Revolution

Imagine our country being on the verge of a second Industrial Revolution – an economic boom so powerful that it alters the United States economy – and the world’s – forever. This is the picture Dr. Doug McCauley (Assistant Professor, Marine Science Institute, University of California Santa Barbara) painted at the beginning of a congressional briefing, hosted by COMPASS, entitled “Counting on Ocean Benefits: A science briefing on the links between the ocean, our economy, and human well-being.”

Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation held a hearing on reducing regulatory burdens. (Credit: Kris Krüg/WikiCommons)

Six Years After The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

On April 20, 2010, the Gulf of Mexico and the lives and livelihoods of those dependent on it changed after an explosion on the Deepwater Horizon oil rig sent oil gushing from the sea floor for 87 days. Efforts are still being made to understand how the 3.1 million barrels of oil and 1.8 million gallons of chemical dispersant (used to break the oil into smaller droplets) have and will affect life in the Gulf of Mexico – both aquatic and human – and the ecosystem itself. At a congressional briefing sponsored by retiring Representative Sam Farr (CA-20), experts came together to discuss the state of understanding of the effects of the spill and direction for the future.

A Goose Point Oyster Co. employee harvests fresh oysters at dawn on the Nisbet family's tidelands in Willapa Bay in 2013. (Credit: Steve Ringman / Seattle Times)

From Bivalves To Blue Crabs: Acidification Brings Challenges To New Marine Life

In school, most students learn to measure acidity or pH with a litmus test. Unfortunately, monitoring the acidity of the ocean is not as simple as dunking a small piece of paper in liquid and waiting for the color to change, and the impacts of acidity changes to marine life are more complex than a simple change in color. Atmospheric carbon dioxide is absorbed by the ocean, which makes it difficult for marine calcifiers (a group comprised of many different organisms, such as molluscs, crustaceans, and corals) to make their own shells and skeletons. Ocean acidification doesn’t just harm these creatures. It threatens our nation’s economic stability, from our $7.3 billion seafood industry to our $101.1 billion recreation and tourism sector. But it doesn’t stop there – it also affects our homeland security.

Plastic bottles on a beach (Credit: Bo Eide/ Flickr)

Trash In The Seas Starts At Home

Marine debris is flooding our oceans at an estimated rate of eight million tons of trash annually, and its results are devastating. Scientists have observed nearly 700 different marine species that have already been negatively impacted by marine plastics, and trash could outweigh fish in the oceans by 2050.

Kelp, green and nutritious, could be Maine's ticket into a multibillion-dollar global aquaculture industry. (Credit: Claire Fackler, CINMS, NOAA)

Just 1 Word For Maine’s Future: Seaweed

Kelp, green and nutritious, could be Maine’s ticket into a multibillion-dollar global aquaculture industry. (From Scientific American/ by Pola Lem) — The state’s nascent seaweed business is thriving, experts say, and that puts Maine...