Tagged: Science

Ecology Lays Out Plan For Considering Pacific Shore Projects

The state Department of Ecology is seeking public comment on a draft plan to address how to make decisions about potential new projects along the Pacific Coast. Requests could be received for such projects as renewable energy, dredging disposal, mining, marine product harvesting, military uses and offshore aquaculture operations, Ecology said. “The Department of Ecology has been leading a state effort to plan and prepare for these potential new coastal uses,” Ecology said in a press release.

(Credit: NOAA)

Science: Predicting The Future, Saving Lives

The United States Geological Survey (USGS), the National​ ​Oceanic​ ​and​ ​Atmospheric​ ​Administration (NOAA) and partners, in conjunction with Senators Shelley Moore Capito (WV) and Bill Nelson (FL) hosted a briefing, “How Science Supports Flood Forecasting and Public Safety.”

Barbara Comstock at the 2017 K-12 STEM Symposium (Credit: WashingtonExec)

House Lawmakers Call For Better STEM Education

The House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology held a Research and Technology subcommittee hearing on Wednesday to explore the future of STEM and computer science education in the United States to prepare today’s youths for much-needed science and engineering jobs. Citing American students’ 19th (science) and 31st (mathematics) rank out of 35 countries, Committee Chairman Lamar Smith (TX-21) advocated the need to “capture and hold the desire of our nation’s youth to study science and engineering so they will want to pursue these careers.” His STEM Education Act of 2015 (P.L.114-5) encourages students to enter STEM fields.

The White House’s science division has largely focused in the past on issues such as biotechnology and STEM education. (Credit: The Hill)

White House Refutes Reports That Science And Technology Office Unstaffed

An official from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) told The Hill the department’s science division is staffed, despite a report saying the last three employees of the division left last week. CBS News reported on Friday three staffers, who were holdovers from the Obama administration, departed the office last week, leaving the science division unstaffed.

Despite the U.S. withdrawing from the Paris agreement, other countries will continue to wards their five-year commitments. (Credit: The Guardian)

Climate Change: “Not A Belief System”

Hardly anyone would play Russian roulette with a one-in-six chance of fatality. Representative Don Beyer (VA-8) drew this analogy at a roundtable discussion on Tuesday, wondering why the United States would take a gamble on climate action when 97 percent of climate scientists agree the climate is changing. At the roundtable hosted by Ranking Member of the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology Eddie Bernice Johnson (TX-30), scientists and climate policy experts discussed the scientific basis for climate action and the international ramifications of climate policies.

The EPA and its regulations that protect human and environmental health are under scrutiny. (Credit: Peter Kratochvil/PublicDomainPictures.net)

States, Science, And The EPA

Early last week amidst the anticipated unveiling of the president’s budget proposal, the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology’s Subcommittee on Environment discussed an equally contentious and ongoing topic – regulations promulgated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Arguments during the hearing echoed those heard before; committee Chairman Lamar Smith (TX-21) stated federal government regulations micromanage states and theorized a “unilateral environmental agenda,” while Ranking Member Suzanne Bonamici (OR-1) insisted they provide an even playing field for all Americans and are a response to “failure of the states to safeguard their residents from pollution in the from air, water, and soil.”

A true-color NASA satellite mosaic of Earth. (Credit: NASA)

A Rose By Any Other Name Would Smell As…Thorny?

When the Environmental Protection Agency finalized the Clean Power Plan in 2015, the agency posted online (as per their norm) hundreds of pages of technical documents, including underlying data, calculations, analyses, and memorandums. Their documentation, such as the Regulatory Impact Analysis, includes review of peer-reviewed literature, and the rule itself (which also used peer-reviewed science to underpin it) received unprecedented input through a number of outreach efforts, including 4.3 million public comments submitted during the six-month public comment period. For an agency so committed to transparency and the use of science for the public good, it should seem surprising that there are efforts by some in Congress to increase this transparency, public participation, and use of good science – but at the expense of allowing EPA to effectively do its job.