Tagged: Science Funding

Researchers from multiple agencies developed a report and online database to provide regional sea level and extreme water level scenarios for the future. (Credit: Infrogmation/Wikipedia).

Resiliency Reaches All Corners Of The Coast Thanks To Sea Grant

Students in Alaska take a field trip to a local salmon stream. An artificial reef is built off the coast of Florida. A duck hunter cleans his gear in Wisconsin. A lifeguard in Delaware explains rip currents to a family on their beach vacation. Even though these differing coastal activities take place over the entire continental U.S., they all have the National Sea Grant College Program (Sea Grant), in common. Sea Grant is comprised of a network of 33 programs along the nation’s coasts that support “research, education, outreach, and extension activities that provide communities with the tools to increase their resiliency capacities.” Sea Grant and the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation held a briefing on the necessity of economic resiliency in coastal communities in the U.S. and featured three speakers who attested to the importance of resiliency and of Sea Grant’s support.

National Science Board sets priorities for the National Science Foundation (Credit: NSF)

Merit Review Report Is Now Available

“Merit review is the lifeblood of NSF. It is how we identify the best science to fund. It is the core of promoting the progress of science and the reason taxpayers give the NSF and the research community so much independence,” said John Anderson, Chair of the National Science Board’s Committee on Audit and Oversight.

National Science Board sets priorities for the National Science Foundation (Credit: NSF)

National Science Board Touts Merits of Merit Review And Looks To The Future

A former patent clerk named Albert Einstein sketched notes on the theory of relativity in 1905. More than a century later, the long-standing theory was validated when the Laser Interferometer Gravitation-Wave Observatory detected gravitational waves originating from the collision of two black holes. This research was funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), which makes possible scientific discovery from space observations to human genetics to volcanic influence on sea level.

Summer in Washington, D.C. (Credit: Tyrol5 / wikimedia)

July Progress On Capitol Hill

The first two weeks of July were especially busy on Capitol Hill as lawmakers made a final legislative push before they left for recess. Appropriations bills were high on their agenda since Fiscal Year (FY) 2016 expires at the end September, and the Senate and House are now on a seven-week hiatus until September 6.

The latest proposed budget cuts are receiving a cold reception from Cognress. (Credit: Pexels)

Defense Appropriations Stalled By Partisanship

The final effort to pass the Senate’s Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2017, S. 3000, fell short, effectively putting an end to this year’s efforts to pass individual appropriations bills. Surprisingly, the partisan split on whether or not to approve the bill, which funds defense agencies, including Navy research and development, was less about the bill itself (spending allocations were under the agreed-upon limit, and the bill passed unanimously out of committee) and wholly about distrust between parties.

The U.S. Capitol Building. (Credit: Architect of the Capitol.)

Ocean Policy Wrap Up for June 2016

Oceans month 2016 saw the reauthorization of the Freedom of Information Act become law, defense appropriations and COMPETES reauthorization advance, and a number of ocean-related bills be introduced in the House and Senate.