Tagged: NOAA

Summary of this month’s ocean and science related legislation. (Credit: Brocken Inaglory / Wikimedia)

Congress’s March Madness

While the budget, health care, and Supreme Court hearings dominated the news this month, members of Congress were also busy introducing bills and passing the first science-related acts of the new year.

A number of new bills introduced in this Congress were of relevance to the ocean science community. One relates to ocean acification research.(Credit: NOAA)

New Congress Means New Legislation

In a scene more appropriate for a college laboratory than the Capitol building (lab safety protocols aside), Senator Sheldon Whitehouse (RI) measured pH on the Senate floor during an ocean acidification demonstration. The act...

The future of NASA will focus on space exploration, while climate and Earth science programs are uncertain. (Credit: Grevera / Wikimedia Commons)

We Choose To Go To The Moon

This week, students and coders in 20 cities across the country voluntarily gathered to collect and back up copies of federal climate data, while on Capitol Hill, lawmakers discussed the future of the Earth Science Mission at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The mission monitors more than a dozen earth science satellites that provide data on the ocean, atmosphere, and biosphere and account for about $2 billion of NASA’s $20 billion budget.

Inspectors general provide recommendations to help agencies regulate smarter. (Credit: NASA)

Listening to the Watchdogs

What good is a watchdog if you ignore its barking? Wouldn’t it be great if Fido not only warned you of trouble as it was happening but gave you a heads up about a problem coming down the road? The Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee held a hearing to receive recommendations from their watchdogs – inspectors general – on how federal agencies can, as Chairman John Thune put it, “regulate smarter – protecting public safety and market fairness while fostering economic grown and innovation.”

Despite swirl of controversy surrounding his blog post, former NOAA scientist agrees that climate change is not to be doubted. Graph from a study by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s) National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) and LMI using the latest global surface temperature data. (Credit: NOAA)

Much Ado About…Data Processing And Archiving Procedures

In 2015, the director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)’s Centers for Environmental Information, Mr. Thomas Karl, published a paper debunking the idea that there had been a pause in global warming. Two years earlier, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report had found a slowdown in warming from 1998-2012 compared to the previous 30 to 60 years.