Tagged: NOAA

Barry Myers, CEO of AccuWeather, has been nominated to lead the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. (Credit: Diane Bondareff/ AP Images)

Trump Administration Science Leadership Roles Move Forward

On Wednesday, President Trump announced his intent to nominate Mr. Barry Myers (CEO, AccuWeather) to lead the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Several other science and technology nominations and confirmations of interest to the ocean science community also occurred. Why It Matters- As our nation recovers from extreme weather events from coast to coast, the importance of NOAA to public safety cannot be understated.

(Credit: NOAA)

Science: Predicting The Future, Saving Lives

The United States Geological Survey (USGS), the National​ ​Oceanic​ ​and​ ​Atmospheric​ ​Administration (NOAA) and partners, in conjunction with Senators Shelley Moore Capito (WV) and Bill Nelson (FL) hosted a briefing, “How Science Supports Flood Forecasting and Public Safety.”

The Magnuson-Stevens Act has helped restore U.S. fish populations, and now 90 percent of fisheries fall below their annual catch limits. (Credit: Bruno de Giusti, Wiki Commons)

Debate Continues Over Magnuson-Stevens Act Reauthorization

The House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water, Power and Oceans held a hearing to address four federal fisheries management bills. Two would reauthorize the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA; PL 109-479) – the Strengthening Fishing Communities and Increasing Flexibility in Fisheries Management Act (H.R. 200) and the Strengthening Fishing Communities through Improving Science, Increasing Flexibility, and Modernizing Fisheries Management Act (a discussion draft that has not been introduced).

Gallaudet

A #2 For NOAA?

The Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee held a hearing to consider four presidential nominees subject to Senate confirmation, including Rear Admiral Timothy Gallaudet (Ret.) to be deputy administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The National Weather Service provides key research and technology for storm, atmosphere, and climate modeling.

At Drought Hearing, Senators Worry National Weather Service Funding Will Dry Up

Dry weather continues to be problematic for Western states, and climate change predictions indicate droughts will only worsen. The president’s budget request for Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 proposes funding cuts to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) by 16 percent – and the proposed four percent decrease to the agency’s National Weather Service would challenge the program. The National Weather Service plays a crucial role in understanding drought patterns, preparing communities for limited water availability, and helping scientists understand the changing climate. Stakeholders say forecasting research and technology innovations are key to future preparedness.

Orbiting Carbon Observatory 2 (OCO-2) (Credit: NASA)

Senate Appropriators Find Science Funding Appropriate

On Thursday, the Senate Committee on Appropriations passed the $53.4 billion Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 2018 (S.1662) bill in a 30-1 vote. “The committee has made difficult but responsible decisions to produce a bill that strikes a financial balance between the competing priorities of law enforcement, national security, scientific advancement, and economic development,” declared Commerce, Justice, and Science Appropriations Subcommittee Chairman Richard Shelby (AL). In the Senate bill, the National Science Foundation (NSF) would be funded at $7.31 billion, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) at $5.59 billion, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) at $19.5 billion, representing cuts from FY 2017 of 2.2 percent, 1.5 percent, and 0.6 percent, respectively. The total reductions in the bill amount to $3.2 billion below the FY 2017 enacted level, but overall funding remains $4.4 billion above the president’s budget request.

Focus on Justice, Not Climate Science, In House Commerce, Justice, and Science Bill — Which Drastically Cuts NOAA Funding

Last week, the House Appropriations Committee passed their version of the Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 Commerce, Justice, Science (CJS) Appropriations bill, which includes funding proposals for the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). During the full committee markup of the bill, which covers a vast array of other agencies and largely prioritizes law enforcement issues like terrorism, cybersecurity, espionage, the opioid epidemic, and border security, both subcommittee Chairman John Culberson (TX-7) and Ranking Member José Serrano (NY-15) expressed their appreciation for each other’s collaboration and friendship during the drafting of the bill, despite their dissimilar policy stances.

Summary of this month’s ocean and science related legislation. (Credit: Brocken Inaglory / Wikimedia)

Congress’s March Madness

While the budget, health care, and Supreme Court hearings dominated the news this month, members of Congress were also busy introducing bills and passing the first science-related acts of the new year.