Tagged: Navy

Gallaudet

A #2 For NOAA?

The Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee held a hearing to consider four presidential nominees subject to Senate confirmation, including Rear Admiral Timothy Gallaudet (Ret.) to be deputy administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Russian nuclear icebreaker Yamal on her way to the North Pole, 2001. (Credit: Wofratz, Wikipedia Commons)

America Losing To Russia 40-3 In Arctic Icebreaker Race

Few ships have a strong enough hull, the appropriate shape, or enough power to push through multiple meters of solid sea ice. Icebreakers are becoming increasingly necessary ships for the Coast Guard as the climate warms and the Arctic thaws, opening the once-inaccessible area to traffic and foreign nations like Russia and China. The House Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation held a hearing to discuss these much-needed vessels (vital for conducting Artic research) with the Coast Guard.

(Click to enlarge) (Credit: U.S. Navy)

Defending the Department of Defense’s Research Funding

Robots running the Navy? Not quite. But artificial intelligence and similar technologies are becoming ever more important in improvements to the U.S. military. The Senate Appropriations Committee, Subcommittee on Defense met Wednesday to discuss the importance of such research to the Department of Defense (DOD) and the Navy, focusing on innovation and research funding.

A number of new bills introduced in this Congress were of relevance to the ocean science community. One relates to ocean acification research.(Credit: NOAA)

New Congress Means New Legislation

In a scene more appropriate for a college laboratory than the Capitol building (lab safety protocols aside), Senator Sheldon Whitehouse (RI) measured pH on the Senate floor during an ocean acidification demonstration. The act...

The Defense Department has been planning for climate change for more than a decade. (Credit: U.S. Navy, Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Tiffini M. Jones)

Who’s Still Fighting Climate Change? The U.S. Military

Ten times a year, the Naval Station Norfolk floods. The entry road swamps. Connecting roads become impassable. Crossing from one side of the base to the other becomes impossible. Dockside, floodwaters overtop the concrete piers, shorting power hookups to the mighty ships that are docked in the world’s largest naval base.

The Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2017, passed both chambers last week and now awaits President Obama's signature. (Credit: Greg Bishop/Flickr)

Congress Approves National Defense Authorization Act For Fiscal Year 2017

One of Congress’ most reliably-passed bills, the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) (S. 2943) sits on President Obama’s desk after passing both chambers late last week with a veto-proof majority (375-34 in the House and 92-7 in the Senate). The president issued veto threats on previous versions of the annual bill, which authorizes activities for the Department of Defense (DoD) and the national security activities of the Department of Energy for Fiscal Year (FY) 2017; however, many provisions he objected to have been removed.

An aerial view of Norfolk Naval Station, the largest naval base in the world. (Credit: Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher B. Stoltz/Released)

Creating A Game Plan For Resiliency Against Rising Seas

Imagine Naval Station Norfolk, the largest naval base in the world, complete with fourteen piers and eleven aircraft hangars, submerged by seawater. That scenario is not far from reality — Norfolk is located in the Hampton Roads, Virginia area, which has seen the highest rates of sea level rise along the eastern coast of the U.S. Its vulnerable location and vital importance to the nation made the area an ideal pilot project, born out of President Obama’s 2013 executive order for the U.S. to prepare for the impacts of climate change. The two-year Hampton Roads Sea Level Rise Preparedness and Resilience Intergovernmental Pilot Project (IPP) was launched in 2014 and headed by Old Dominion University.

The U.S. Navy base in Norfolk, Virginia, is one of the many U.S. military bases located on the coast. (Credit: Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ernest R. Scott/Wikipedia)

Military Experts Agree: Consequences Of Climate Change Are Clear

Starving polar bears and bleached coral reefs are often the face of climate change today, but what many people do not realize is that climate change also threatens national security. Members of the U.S. national security community have been studying the impacts of climate change, namely sea level rise, and the associated threats to our military installations and missions. The results of their studies were compiled into three reports that were discussed at this week’s first annual Climate and National Security Forum. The forum consisted of three panels with several authors from each report serving on the respective panels.