Tagged: Climate Change

The U.S. Navy base in Norfolk, Virginia, is one of the many U.S. military bases located on the coast. (Credit: Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ernest R. Scott/Wikipedia)

Why The Military Plans For Climate Change

In a world where terrorism and nuclear arms races abound, many Americans don’t link climate change and national security. However, military leaders want you to know that changing climate conditions do pose a threat to our nation — as they acknowledged in the 2014 Quadrennial Defense Review — and that we can’t prepare properly for its effects without knowing more about the ocean and atmosphere. In a joint briefing Thursday held by the Center for Climate Security and the American Security Project, “Climate Change and the Risks to National Security,” senior military and national security experts Vice Admiral Dennis McGinn, USN (Ret.), Brigadier General Stephen Cheney, USMC (Ret.), and Brigadier General David McGinnis, USA (Ret.) discussed how climate change effectively alters the environment in which the military operates.

Representatives Eddie Bernice Johnson (D–TX) and Lamar Smith (R–TX) (Credit: House Committee on Science, Space & Technology)

Climate Science Contention

A “sparring session,” “train wreck,” and “food fight” are not words normally used to describe activities in the halls of Congress, but they were last week. During a contentious, partisan hearing that drew accusations...

Emissions from coal fired power plant. (Credit: Emilian Robert Vicol/Flickr)

Trump Dramatically Changes US Approach To Climate Change

President Donald Trump signed a sweeping executive order Tuesday at the Environmental Protection Agency, which officials said looks to curb the federal government’s enforcement of climate regulations by putting American jobs above addressing climate change. The order represents a clear difference between how Trump and former President Barack Obama view the role the United States plays in combating climate change, and dramatically alters the government’s approach to rising sea levels and temperatures — two impacts of climate change.

A number of new bills introduced in this Congress were of relevance to the ocean science community. One relates to ocean acification research.(Credit: NOAA)

New Congress Means New Legislation

In a scene more appropriate for a college laboratory than the Capitol building (lab safety protocols aside), Senator Sheldon Whitehouse (RI) measured pH on the Senate floor during an ocean acidification demonstration. The act...

Despite swirl of controversy surrounding his blog post, former NOAA scientist agrees that climate change is not to be doubted. Graph from a study by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s) National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) and LMI using the latest global surface temperature data. (Credit: NOAA)

Much Ado About…Data Processing And Archiving Procedures

In 2015, the director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)’s Centers for Environmental Information, Mr. Thomas Karl, published a paper debunking the idea that there had been a pause in global warming. Two years earlier, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report had found a slowdown in warming from 1998-2012 compared to the previous 30 to 60 years.

Meeting of the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology lays out legislative jurisdiction and includes a promise for fewer subpoenas from Chairman Lamar Smith. (Credit: Kirt L. Onthank/ Wikimedia Commons)

House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology Framework For 115th Congress

It’s hard to keep up with the overabundance of news coming out of D.C., so it would be easy to miss last week’s organizational meeting of the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. During this time, the committee approved their Authorization and Oversight Plan (which broadly lays out their framework for the 115th Congress) and committee rules.

The Defense Department has been planning for climate change for more than a decade. (Credit: U.S. Navy, Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Tiffini M. Jones)

Who’s Still Fighting Climate Change? The U.S. Military

Ten times a year, the Naval Station Norfolk floods. The entry road swamps. Connecting roads become impassable. Crossing from one side of the base to the other becomes impossible. Dockside, floodwaters overtop the concrete piers, shorting power hookups to the mighty ships that are docked in the world’s largest naval base.

Jon White, president and CEO of the Consortium for Ocean Leadership in Washington, D. C. (Credit: Randy Showstack)

Scientists Ponder The Way Forward Under Incoming Administration

The recent U.S. presidential election loomed large last week at the world’s largest annual gathering of Earth and space scientists, the American Geophysical Union’s (AGU) Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. When Eos asked some of the more than 20,000 scientists at the meeting what they thought the election’s outcome means for the Earth and space sciences, we heard a wide range of responses, from dismissal of the election’s importance to deep concern.

The new resilience area spans from north of the Bering Strait, shown here, to north of Bristol Bay, which is farther south. (Credit: NASA/GSFC/JPL/MISR-Team)

Obama Creates ‘Resilience Area’ To Protect Bering Ecosystem

President Barack Obama responded to appeals from Alaska Native villages and gave them more of a say in the federal management of marine resources of the Bering Sea. Obama signed an executive order Friday to create a Northern Bering Sea Climate Resilience Area that will focus “locally tailored” protections on marine resources. The newly created resilience area covers 112,300 square miles and stretches from north of the Bering Strait to north of Bristol Bay. The order requires more focused federal consultation with Alaska tribes and 39 communities that line the west coast of Alaska, along with state officials. The area supports what may be the world’s largest annual marine mammal migration of bowhead and beluga whales, Pacific walrus, ice seals and migratory birds.