Category: Policy News

Despite swirl of controversy surrounding his blog post, former NOAA scientist agrees that climate change is not to be doubted. Graph from a study by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s) National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) and LMI using the latest global surface temperature data. (Credit: NOAA)

Much Ado About…Data Processing And Archiving Procedures

In 2015, the director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)’s Centers for Environmental Information, Mr. Thomas Karl, published a paper debunking the idea that there had been a pause in global warming. Two years earlier, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report had found a slowdown in warming from 1998-2012 compared to the previous 30 to 60 years.

Meeting of the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology lays out legislative jurisdiction and includes a promise for fewer subpoenas from Chairman Lamar Smith. (Credit: Kirt L. Onthank/ Wikimedia Commons)

House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology Framework For 115th Congress

It’s hard to keep up with the overabundance of news coming out of D.C., so it would be easy to miss last week’s organizational meeting of the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. During this time, the committee approved their Authorization and Oversight Plan (which broadly lays out their framework for the 115th Congress) and committee rules.

The Defense Department has been planning for climate change for more than a decade. (Credit: U.S. Navy, Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Tiffini M. Jones)

Who’s Still Fighting Climate Change? The U.S. Military

Ten times a year, the Naval Station Norfolk floods. The entry road swamps. Connecting roads become impassable. Crossing from one side of the base to the other becomes impossible. Dockside, floodwaters overtop the concrete piers, shorting power hookups to the mighty ships that are docked in the world’s largest naval base.

Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation held a hearing on reducing regulatory burdens. (Credit: Kris Krüg/WikiCommons)

Regulations Give and Take: Implement One, Repeal Two

A two-for-one deal on regulations issued by President Donald Trump’s Executive Order last week requires federal agencies to eliminate at least two existing regulations for every new one implemented. This was one of the central themes discussed in a hearing of the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee that focused on reducing regulatory burdens.

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Cabinet Updates: Boycotts, Delays, Rule Changes, and Some Bipartisan Support

After rescheduled hearings, the Senate moved forward on a number of Trump administration cabinet picks in a tumultuous week of partisan showdowns and dragged-out votes. On Wednesday, 10 empty seats at the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee confirmation hearing signaled a Democratic boycott on the nomination of Mr. Scott Pruitt to lead the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). However, Republicans advanced Mr. Pruitt’s nomination without their counterparts across the aisle by suspending committee rules that required two members of the minority party be present for the vote.

Committee passes unfinished science bills from 114th Congress and approves cabinet nominees(Credit: NMFS/Southwest Fisheries Science Center)

Senate Commerce Committee Hits The Ground Running

It took only 25 minutes for the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation to advance 16 bills this week, including several of relevance to the ocean science community. Many of the measures were considered during the 114th Congress, and most had bipartisan support.